Is Elizabeth Arden Cruelty-Free?

Elizabeth Arden is an American global beauty brand that are best known for their high quality skincare, makeup and fragrance products. Created by Miss Elizabeth Arden (aka Florence Nightingale Graham) in 1910, and through her inspiring entrepreneurial spirit she grew the brand to global status by the 1930s. And to this day, thanks to her vision, the brand continues to be a global beauty powerhouse.

However, are they a cruelty-free brand? And do they sell their products in China?

Scroll down to find out.

Elizabeth Arden's Animal Testing Policy

It was easy to find Elizabeth Arden’s animal testing policy on their website, and I have linked their policy in full here:

Elizabeth Arden, Inc. shares your concern about the use of animals in safety testing and is committed to eliminating the need for animal testing. We are equally committed to the health and safety of consumers and to creating products that comply with the laws of all countries where our products are sold. We do not perform any animal tests on our product formulations or ingredients, nor ask others to test on our behalf, except in the rare instances where required by law. These laws apply to every company in the beauty industry that sells products globally, and Elizabeth Arden, like all other global beauty companies, must comply with any applicable local laws.

To avoid the use of tests on animals, our product development team selects raw materials with well-established safety records and uses extensive ingredient databases. Our product safety testing includes the use of non-animal studies and clinical tests on volunteers. We take great pride in our product safety record.

Our ultimate goal is to eliminate the necessity for animal testing globally. We work closely with our industry and the scientific community around the world to actively support our industry’s sharing of scientific data and to support and fund research programs to develop and validate non-animal alternatives for product testing.

The conclusion from their animal testing policy statement is that Elizabeth Arden are NOT cruelty-free. This is due to the fact that they choose to sell their products in countries which require animal testing by law (i.e. mainland China).

The part of their animal testing policy which I found very misleading is the following section:

We do not perform any animal tests on our product formulations or ingredients, nor ask others to test on our behalf, except in the rare instances where required by law. These laws apply to every company in the beauty industry that sells products globally, and Elizabeth Arden, like all other global beauty companies, must comply with any applicable local laws.

Elizabeth Arden are incorrect in this statement, because there are many cruelty-free beauty brands that are global too. Brands such as COVERGIRL is a famous global beauty brand that is cruelty-free and even Leaping Bunny certified! That is because they choose to not sell their products in stores in countries which require animal testing if they do so. Elizabeth Arden, along with all the other global beauty brands, have a simple choice; be a kind global beauty brand, or choose to sell your products in countries with draconian animal testing laws. It’s that simple.

Is Elizabeth Arden Sold in mainland China?

Yes, Elizabeth Arden is sold in stores in mainland China, meaning that this brand is NOT cruelty-free.

As they have stated on their website. The brand will allow the authorities to test their products on animals if the law requires them to do so. The Chinese authorities require foreign brands sold in stores in China to allow them to test their products, and even their ingredients, on animals. Which means since Elizabeth Arden chooses to sell their products in China, they cannot be considered cruelty-free.

If you want to learn more about animal testing in the cosmetics industry, and the policies regarding animal testing in China, then please check out these articles:

Is Elizabeth Arden Cruelty-Free?

No, Elizabeth Arden is NOT a cruelty-free brand.

Cruelty-Free Brands That Are Like Elizabeth Arden

It is always super disappointing to find out that a brand that we love, isn’t cruelty-free. However, don’t worry there are still plenty of kind beauty brands on offer to replace them with.

Elizabeth Arden are best known for their great fragrance, makeup, and skincare products. However, there are many other kind beauty brands that will provide you with plenty of choose in cruelty-free fragrance, makeup, and skincare. I’ve made a list of such brands below.

Then when the time comes for when you need to replace a Elizabeth Arden product with a cruelty-free alternative, you can do so quick and easy by coming back to this article.

Check out my list of cruelty-free brands I recommend:

** = Parent Company is not cruelty-free

V = 100% Vegan Brand

Cruelty-Free Brand They can replace your Elizabeth Arden products in…
Charlotte Tilbury
  • Makeup
CLEAN [V]
  • Fragrance
Dr. Hauschka
  • Skincare
  • Body care
  • Makeup
Elemis
  • Skincare
  • Body care
Glo Skin Beauty
  • Skincare
  • Makeup
Hourglass **
  • Makeup
INIKA [V]
  • Skincare
  • Makeup
Jane Iredale
  • Skincare
  • Makeup
Josie Maren
  • Skincare
  • Body care
  • Makeup
Kate Somerville **
  • Skincare
Koh Gen Doh
  • Skincare
  • Makeup
Panhaligion’s
  • Fragrance
StriVectin
  • Skincare
TATCHA **
  • Skincare
Youth to the People [V]
  • Skincare

More Cruelty-Free Alternatives to Elizabeth Arden

There is a whole world of cruelty-free brands out there waiting to be discovered.

My goal on this site is to make it as easy as possible for you to do that. For some more cruelty-free and vegan beauty inspiration, you should check out the following articles:

You can also find cruelty-free shopping guides for Amazon, Ulta, Sephora, Boots, Cult Beauty, and more, on this site!

Elizabeth Arden may not be a cruelty-free brand, but there are so many more kind beauty brands out there to choose from, that you won’t even miss them.

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